Archive for the ‘Judo’ Category

Budokai Judo Club: Toronto’s Newest Martial Arts Club for Kids of All Ages

Tuesday, July 24th, 2012

Based in North York, Ontario, Budokai Judo Club is the Greater Toronto’s Area’s (GTA) answer to the best in professional judo instruction for kids of all ages.

Known for its physical and psychological benefits (fitness, confidence, bully-proofing), judo is the ideal martial art for kids.  Both a martial art and an official Olympic sport since 1964.

Many say that judo is the best martial art for kids

Judo is at its most effective when one is being attached or assaulted. With its emphasis on leverage, judo teaches a smaller person how to overcome a larger person using minimal force by using an attacker’s strength against them.

As Budokai judo instructor Ray Litvak says, “A well trained judoka (judo practitioner) is not in the habit of starting a fight.  At Budokai, we teach students how to avoid physical confrontations. But when presented with no other alternative, a well-trained judoka will finish a fight.”

Founded by Sensei’s Rick Koglin and Ray Litvak, (Certified Judo black belts and instructors), the goal of the club is to imbue its students with the character, confidence and courage that practicing judo over time instills in its students.

Judo is practiced by children (boys and girls) men and women world-wide and the club welcomes all, from beginner to advanced judoka.

The club is located in the heart of North York at  1110-5 Finch Ave. West, North York, Ontario M3J 2T2 and is located in the North York Aikido Club/Aikido Hokuryukai.  The club will officially open its doors on Sunday August, 19, 2012.  For more information, or to pre-register,  please contact  Rick Koglin at (416) 712-6751 or  e-mail us today.

About Budokai Judo Club

Based in North York, Ontario, Budokai Judo Club is the Greater Toronto Area’s (GTA) answer to professional judo instruction (recreational, fitness and competitive) for people of all ages.

Providing judo lessons for the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) including Toronto, North York, Downsview, Vaughan, Thornhill, Richmond Hill, Woodbridge and York Region, Ontario.

Judo Club Toronto

Which Martial Art is Best? Part 1: JUDO

Tuesday, February 9th, 2010

Over the last couple of months, we’ve discussed plenty of mixed martial arts. But sometimes it’s fun to break down each discipline that comprises MMA. A question we used to ask (say, in the days of the first UFC) but don’t anymore is: which is the most effective martial art?

Over the next few weeks, I’ll cover as many disciplines as I can. We’ll start with Judo.

A combination of throws, takedowns and  grappling, Judo was developed in the late 1800s by Dr. Jigoro Kano in Japan. The name of the game is leverage – taking away your opponents’ balance to set up throws. The best Judo practitioners are masters at defeating opponents much larger than them.

So how does Judo stack up against other elements? Essentially, it has similar strengths to both wrestling and Brazilian Jitsu while remaining a unique art. Like wrestlers, Judoka use lots of creative leg sweeps and takedowns to take away opponents’ footing, minimize their balance and neutralize their striking power. Once on the ground, Judoka control their opponent’s using a variety of hold downs, chokes and arm locks, just as BJJ practitioners do.

One strength I notice among Judoka – especially those competing in MMA – is an outstanding ability to evade trouble on the ground. Their timing and leverage makes them very tough to keep in one place.

Famous Judo practitioners: Fedor Emelianenko, Karo Parisyan

Given MMA’s popularity, there’s no more famous Judoka today than Fedor Emelianenko. He’s a Russian gold medalist and Master of Sports in Judo. Given his numerous wins over opponents much bigger than him – like Bob Sapp and Hong-Man Choi – it’s no surprise that he’s a Judo master. That said, Fedor incorporates other elements such as Sambo and boxing into his repertoire.

So where does Judo’s effectiveness rank? The main (if only) criticism is that it doesn’t develop a fighter’s striking ability. On one hand, Fedor has defeated striking juggernauts like Mirko Cro Cop using takedowns; on the other hand, he wouldn’t be nearly as dominant if he didn’t also have heavy hands.

Perhaps a better measuring stick of Judo’s effectiveness is Karo Parisyan, who practices Judo in MMA more exclusively. He’s performed well against other ground fighters, tossing them around the cage like ragdolls. But, when Parisyan struggles, it’s against powerhouse strikers like Thiago Alves (Muay Thai) or Georges St-Pierre (Karate).

As we move onto our next martial art, we know Judo is an extremely effective discipline in that it allows fighters to engage any opponent of any size at any time. But we also know that it leaves a hole in the striking department – one that certain types of fighters can exploit.

By Matt Larkin
Guest Writer

Judo Clubs Toronto,  North York, Brampton, Etobicoke, Markham, Mississauga, Oshawa, Peel Region, Pickering, Richmond Hill, Scarborough, Thornhill, Vaughan, Woodbridge, York, York Region Ontario Canada.

North York Judo Tournament

Sunday, October 4th, 2009

The North York Judo Club is hosting ‘The North York Tournament of Champions’ on Saturday October 24th, 2009.

Held at Crescent School (Field House), 2365 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, the tournament will be eligible to all paid up members of Judo Ontario, Judo Canada and International Judo Federation (IJF) recognized Associations.

Divisions will include Juvenile (male and female) and Seniors (male and female) with a minimum of 4 competitors per division.

For more information, contact the North York Judo Club.

Ontario’s Largest Judo Tournament

Sunday, September 20th, 2009

Will be held on November 7th and 8th in Kingston, Ontario…

According to the Judo Ontario website, “The 2009 Ontario International Open promises to be Judo Ontario’s largest tournament to date with competitors coming from across Canada, the United States and around the globe.”

The Judo tournament will take place at the Kingston Military Community Sports Centre.

Find a Judo Club in Ontario or Learn About Judo.

Montreal Judo Tournament

Wednesday, September 2nd, 2009

One of Canada’s most prestigious Judo tournaments, Rendezvous Canada, will be help in Montreal, Quebec on October 17th and 18th, 2009.

Including Senior Men’s and Women’s Judo divisions, the tournament will feature high level competition from International Judo players and teams.

The tournament will take place at:
Centre Pierre Charbonneau,
3000, boul. Viau
Montreal Quebec
H1V 3J3

Click here for Judo Tournament details…

Judo Clubs Toronto Acton, Ajax, Aurora, Barrie, Belleville, Bolton, Bowmanville, Bradford, Brampton, Brantford, Brockville, Burlington, Cambridge, Chatham, Cornwall, Elliot Lake, Etobicoke, Georgetown, Guelph, Halton, Hamilton, Kanata, Kingston, Kitchener, Lindsay, Leamington, Listowel, London, Markham, Midland, Milton, Mississauga, Montreal, Newmarket, Niagara Falls, North Bay, North York, Oakville, Orangeville, Orillia, Oshawa, Ottawa, Owen Sound, Peel Region, Peterborough, Pickering, Richmond Hill, Sarnia, Scarborough, Sault Ste. Marie, St. Thomas, St. Catharines, Stratford, Sudbury, Thornhill, Thunder Bay, Timmins, Toronto, Trenton, Vaughan, Waterloo, Welland, Windsor, Woodbridge, Woodstock, York, York Region Ontario Canada.

Top 10 Differences Between BJJ and Judo

Friday, July 24th, 2009

After 30 years of doing anything – or anyone – continuously, one might find themselves at a crossroads, perhaps feeling that change is in order.  Some call this a mid-life crisis and as a result may get married, divorced, re-married, divorced again, commit a crime spree or just buy a white sports car.  At 45 years of age, I’d done most of the above.

But my case was different.  The crisis I was experiencing was a ‘Martial Arts Mid Life Crisis.’  Yes, 30 years of doing any martial art – Judo in this case – can do that to you. 

So I strayed and left my first martial art love for something new – Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ). 

Why BJJ?  I suppose the seed had been planted back in 1993 after witnessing my first UFC.  Watching Royce Gracie choke and armlock his way to victory using techniques familiar to and practiced by Judoka everywhere, but with funky names like the Kimura, Guard and Triangle Choke. 

Other reasons for choosing BJJ were to test my Judo skills against this fairly new art – 95% of which takes place on the ground – and to better learn how to fight off my back.

So, I joined a BJJ Club.  What follows are some first hand observations and noted differences between these 2 related, yet different, martial arts:

1. Lineage: Judo was developed in Japan by Jigoro Kano in the late 1800’s, a variation of Jujitsu.    As its namesake implies, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ) was developed and modified in Brazil by the Gracie brothers after having being taught Judo.
2. Uniform: Judoka wear heavy weave Gi’s (kimonos) tied by a belt and with no undergarments (save underwear – hopefully); BJJ practitioners tend to wear a single weave and much lighter Gi that is tied by a belt.  They also tend to wear funky form fitting and shiny undergarments called rash guards that can be worn under the Gi.  For lack of a better term, they’re cool. Furthermore, BJJ practitioners adorn and accessorize their Gi’s with color-coordinated patches and logos, usually representing clubs, affiliations and/or both.  Lastly, BJJ can be practised with a Gi or no Gi; a big plus for those interested in MMA and Self-Defense.
3. Fighting Styles: Traditional Judo clubs focus on throws and takedowns which are scored accordingly in shiai (tournaments).  For example, a perfect throw, one that demonstrates control, power and impetus can score a perfect point, the equivalent of a knockout punch.  A perfect throw (Ippon) is the ultimate goal of most Judoka.  One can also win on the ground via a submission (choke, arm lock) and/or hold down.  Most Judo Clubs will focus 70-80 percent (or more) of their training on throws with the balance on ground work.  Conversely, BJJ practitioners spend about 80-90 percent (or more) on the ground.  Throws and takedowns are secondary and are scored as such.  The ultimate goal in BJJ competition is a submission.
4. Tempo: For advanced BJJ competitors – blue to black belt – matches can run from 6 to 10 minutes with the majority of the contest taking placing on the ground/grappling.  The average Judo match – for advanced and beginners – runs 5 minutes, with the majority of the contest taking place standing up.  Unlike BJJ, if a Judo contest does go to the ground, fighters are given very little time to work a hold down or submission and if there is no immediate progression, fighters are quickly brought back to the standing position.  As well, a lull in action from either fighter results in penalties. As a result of shorter matches and penalties for inactivity, Judo fights tend to be faster paced and more frenetic. BJJ fights tend to have a slower tempo as fighters work on the ground to gain position, control and eventually, submissions.  Extended durations may also result in a slower and more deliberate pace during BJJ matches, in large part to conserve energy and to set an opponent up for a submission.
5. Terminology: Steeped in Japanese tradition, Judo throws and techniques have Japanese origins and names.  For example, the fireman’s carry (a common wrestling takedown) is known as ‘kata-guruma’ in Judo.  Another common wrestling takedown – the double leg takedown – is known as ‘morote-gari’ in Judo. The rear naked choke is known as ‘hadaka jime.’  BJJ, on the other hand, has exotic and descriptive names that roll off the tongue and pique the imagination.  For example, ‘peruvian neck tie,’ ‘omoplata,’ ‘nonoplata,’ ‘gogoplata’ and more. Other techniques have been anglicized and named so that the average person can easily visualize them, even those with no martial arts background.  For example, the ‘guillotine choke,’ ‘clock choke,’ ‘collar choke,’ ‘spin around armbar,’ ‘guard to arm lock no gi.’ These terms, for lack of a better term, just sound cool. 
6. Belt Gradings: Judoka begin at white belt and from there, progress to yellow, orange, green, blue, brown and eventually black belt.  At each level, students are required to know a certain number of throws, hold downs, chokes, and arm locks to advance.  For black belt, it is necessary to perform ‘kata’ which are also known as forms.  Prior to being eligible for a black belt and performing ‘kata,’ a Judoka must first  compete and accumulate a certain amount of  points by entering tournaments and winning fights.  Depending on how they win and the rank of the person(s) they beat, they are awarded points.  The process is very formal. An enthusiastic Judoka that practices 3-4 times per week and that competes should be able to attain their first degree black belt within 4-5 years.  Like Judo, BJJ uses a belt grading system, but that is where the similarity ends.  BJJ practitioners start as white belts and progress to blue, purple, brown and black belt.  After attaining each belt, stripes may also be awarded to signify progress and levels of competence.  Rather than forms, belt gradings are informal and conservative in nature: belts are awarded at the instructor’s discretion and seem to be heavily influenced by attendance, progress and time spent on the mat.  That said, a BJJ practitioner may remain at the same belt level for years at a time.  An enthusiastic and avid BJJ practitioner should be able to attain their black belt within 8-9 years.  An exceptional student, perhaps sooner.
7. Honorifics: Seniority and respect play a large role in Judo.  Senior students and/or instructors are referred to as ‘Sempai’ and are the equivalent of mentors while ‘Kohai’ are the equivalent of  trainees.  In Judo, the term ‘Sensei’ is usually reserved for 3rd degree black belts and up, but may be used by colored belts when addressing any black belt.  The term is used in reference to those that have achieved a certain level of mastery and maturity.  In BJJ, the equivalent of Sensei is Professor and is only used when addressing black belts.   The term ‘professor’ has a scholarly overtone and again, is one that the average person can easily identify with. 
8. Profit vs Non-Profit: As a rule, Judo Clubs are run as non-profit and can often be found in community center’s and/or rented out spaces.  It’s rare to find a Judo Club as a standalone storefront/entity.  Unlike Judo, BJJ is for profit and charges accordingly; charging what Judo clubs ought to be charging.
9. Conduct: Judo tends to be formal in its on-the-mat interactions.  For example, it is proper etiquette to bow before entering and after leaving the dojo mat area.  It is also proper etiquette to bow to your partner before and after a randori (freestyle practice or sparring) and/or ne-waza (ground work/grappling) practice session.  BJJ clubs are less formal and as a rule, emphasize camaraderie more so than formality.  For example, prior to and following a practice session (rolling), participants will shake or slap hands.  Should one partner submit the other during a rolling session, they will break and shake or slap hands.  At the end of the BJJ class, everyone is acknowledged and appreciated for their efforts with hand shakes, hand slaps and partial hugs.
Note: this is the behavior demonstrated at the BJJ club that yours truly belongs to and, as a result, can not be verified as common practice among all BJJ clubs.
10. Perception: Although an Olympic sport, practiced world-wide and over 100 years old, Judo has an image problem.  In general, the Judo community has no idea how to market itself.  Rather than embracing a resurgence in Martial Arts vis-a-vis MMA and the UFC, Judo seems to have turned a blind eye to the opportunity, preferring to suffer in silence.   Sadly, if Judo were an animal, it would be on the endangered species list.  On the other hand, BJJ is flourishing. It is marketed as a form of self-defense and a staple to any serious mixed-martial artists game.  No doubt helped in large part by the UFC, Royce Gracie’s MMA legacy and the continued success of BJJ practitioners in mixed martial arts.

In essence, both Judo and BJJ are great sports/martial arts and forms of self-defense that have a lot to offer both purists and mixed martial artists alike.  Now, if Judo can learn from the BJJ brain trust, it just may have a fighting chance of surviving the coming decades.  In the meantime, I’ve temporarily traded in my Judo black belt for a BJJ white belt and am enjoying every minute of it.

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ) – Toronto, Acton, Ajax, Aurora, Barrie, Belleville, Bolton, Bowmanville, Bradford, Brampton, Brantford, Brockville, Burlington, Cambridge, Chatham, Cornwall, Elliot Lake, Etobicoke, Georgetown, Guelph, Halton, Hamilton, Kanata, Kingston, Kitchener, Lindsay, Leamington, Listowel, London, Markham, Midland, Milton, Mississauga,  Newmarket, Niagara Falls, North Bay, North York, Oakville, Orangeville, Orillia, Oshawa, Ottawa, Owen Sound, Peel Region, Peterborough, Pickering, Richmond Hill, Sarnia, Scarborough, Sault Ste. Marie, St. Thomas, St. Catharines, Stratford, Sudbury, Thornhill, Thunder Bay, Timmins, Toronto, Trenton, Vaughan, Waterloo, Welland, Windsor, Woodbridge, Woodstock, York, York Region Ontario Canada

UFC 100

Friday, July 10th, 2009

Who ever thought there’d be a UFC 2, let alone 100!? 

Anyways, UFC 100 is taking place this Saturday and will feature one of the biggest and best fight cards – if not the best – ever.  So big in fact that it doesn’t even need a title; or maybe Dana ran out of them.

UFC 100 will be stacked with future hall of famer’s Frank Mir, Georges “Rush” St-Pierre, Dan “Hendo” Henderson and possibly Brock “Who Needs Technique?” Lesnar.  Yes, the MMA Gods do have a sense of humor.

Less known, but no less exciting, is the UFC debut of Judo ace Yoshihiro Akiyama.  No stranger to Mixed Martial Arts (MMA), Akiyama has made a name for himself in Japan’s K-1 circuit where he holds a record of 12 wins, one loss and 2 no contest; albeit not without controversy.  It seems that a combination of dipping into the Oil of Olay – no doubt giving him an ageless appearance – and mom using too much fabric softener on the gi (hate when that happens) has plagued Akiyama and his opponents; especially those trying to get a hold of him.  Hopefully we’ve seen the last of these ‘Slipperyama’ tactics.

Speaking of monikers – and no, I don’t make this s@%t up – is Akiyama’s pseudonym; that of Yoshihiro “Sexyama” Akiyama.  Now if that doesn’t put the fear into you, nothing will.  He’ll be taking on Alan “The Talent” Belcher whose MMA record speaks for itself at 14 wins and 5 losses (2 by decision). 

And just so Akiyama doesn’t feel so all alone in his UFC debut is the entry of fellow Judoka Dong Hyun Kim who holds an MMA record of 11 wins and no losses.  Fighting Kim will be Canadian submission expert TJ “No Gimmick” Grant, who holds an MMA record of 14 wins (12 by submission) and 2 losses.

UFC 100 may just live up to the hype this time around.  Stay tuned…

Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) – Toronto, Acton, Ajax, Aurora, Barrie, Belleville, Bolton, Bowmanville, Bradford, Brampton, Brantford, Brockville, Burlington, Cambridge, Chatham, Cornwall, Elliot Lake, Etobicoke, Georgetown, Guelph, Halton, Hamilton, Kanata, Kingston, Kitchener, Lindsay, Leamington, Listowel, London, Markham, Midland, Milton, Mississauga,  Newmarket, Niagara Falls, North Bay, North York, Oakville, Orangeville, Orillia, Oshawa, Ottawa, Owen Sound, Peel Region, Peterborough, Pickering, Richmond Hill, Sarnia, Scarborough, Sault Ste. Marie, St. Thomas, St. Catharines, Stratford, Sudbury, Thornhill, Thunder Bay, Timmins, Toronto, Trenton, Vaughan, Waterloo, Welland, Windsor, Woodbridge, Woodstock, York, York Region Ontario Canada.

The Curious Case of Judo in MMA

Thursday, July 2nd, 2009

Wrestling, Muay Thai, BJJ, Karate and even Sambo have them, which begs the question: “Why doesn’t Judo?” 

In question is the absence of world-class Judo and Judoka from the list of Ultimate Fighting Champion (UFC) and Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) title holders over the years.  The situation becomes even more curious when one considers the effectiveness of Judo techniques in Mixed Martial Arts events.

But  in order to compete and win you have to show up.  And to date, world-class Judoka have mostly been absent from both UFC and MMA events.  Perhaps neither holds interest for these world class athletes.

Or is it a case of the Judo community holding itself to a higher standard, preferring to not be associated with what some see as a modified version of ‘Pro Wrestling’, albeit with out pre-determined outcomes.  Historically, Japanese Judo Players that have participated in Mixed Martial Arts and Wrestling events, either in or outside of Japan, were often shunned from the Judo Community, with ranks/dans frozen for life followed by permanent expulsion.

Perhaps Judo – a softer and kinder version of Japanese Combat Jiu Jitsu less strikes and lethal joint locks – doesn’t lend itself to Mixed Martial Arts (MMA).  Maybe modern Judo is a true Olympic sport and has no place in professional fighting.

That said, Judo techniques are frequently used by top level UFC and MMA stylists including takedowns, throws, arm locks and chokes. In fact, The Kimura arm lock has been known in Judo as udi garami for over 125 years, along with The Triangle Choke (Sankaku Jime) and the most common arm lock in MMA; long known as Juji Gatame in Judo.

Despite the preamble, Judo could and should hold a prominent place among the UFC and MMA’s elite.  Despite weak representation to date, the few Judoka that have ventured into MMA have tasted success.

Case in point: Hedihiko Yoshida – 1992 Olympic Judo Gold Medalist – has a number of MMA wins to his credit against notable opponents including Don Frye, Mark Hunt, Maurice Smith, Tank Abbott and Royce Gracie.

Karo Parysian – considered the best yet at adapting Judo to No-Gi MMA has wins over notable mixed martial artist’s Ryo Chonan, Josh Burkman, Drew Fickett, Matt Serra, Chris Lytle, Nick Diaz, Shonie Carter, Scott Davis and more.

But the latest Judoka to enter the scene may have the best chance yet at raising Judo’s profile as an MMA contender.  The Judoka in question is Satoshi Ishii – 2008 Olympic 100kg Gold Medalist.

With a solid Judo pedigree and training partners like Lyoto Machido & Fedor Emelianenko,  Ishii should have a leg up transitioning from Judo to MMA. 

If Ishii can put together a decent striking game and defense, he should be a force to be reckoned with, perhaps giving Judo some much needed MMA cred and its rightful place among MMAs elite.

Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) – Toronto, Acton, Ajax, Aurora, Barrie, Belleville, Bolton, Bowmanville, Bradford, Brampton, Brantford, Brockville, Burlington, Cambridge, Chatham, Cornwall, Elliot Lake, Etobicoke, Georgetown, Guelph, Halton, Hamilton, Kanata, Kingston, Kitchener, Lindsay, Leamington, Listowel, London, Markham, Midland, Milton, Mississauga,  Newmarket, Niagara Falls, North Bay, North York, Oakville, Orangeville, Orillia, Oshawa, Ottawa, Owen Sound, Peel Region, Peterborough, Pickering, Richmond Hill, Sarnia, Scarborough, Sault Ste. Marie, St. Thomas, St. Catharines, Stratford, Sudbury, Thornhill, Thunder Bay, Timmins, Toronto, Trenton, Vaughan, Waterloo, Welland, Windsor, Woodbridge, Woodstock, York, York Region Ontario Canada.

11th World Master Athlete Judo Championships 2009 USA

Wednesday, June 24th, 2009

If you’re a Canadian Judo Player who is 30 or over, it’s time to dust off that old Judo gi and belt for The 11th World Master Athlete Judo Championships.  Taking place in Atlanta, Georgia from August 19th to 23rd 2009 at The Georgia International Convention Centre, the tournament will feature more than 20 countries and is shaping up to be the biggest and best yet.

Spread over 5 days, The tournament will have something for all Master Judoka – male and female – including shiai (individual and team tournaments) and kata (forms) competition for:
• Goshin-Jitsu
• Ju-no-kata
• Katame-no-kata
• Kime-no-kata
• Koshiki-no-kata
• Nage-no-kata
• Itsutsu-no-kata

Age ranges start from 30 and go to 80+

International Judo Federation rules will apply with the contest duration as the only modification – all contests 3 minutes duration except 60 years and over 2½ minutes.

For more information, contact The World Master Athlete Judo Association at info@masterathlete.com or visit their website at www.masterathlete.com/usa2009.htm

Judo Club Directory Serving Toronto, Acton, Ajax, Aurora, Barrie, Belleville, Bolton, Bowmanville, Bradford, Brampton, Brantford, Brockville, Burlington, Cambridge, Chatham, Cornwall, Elliot Lake, Etobicoke, Georgetown, Guelph, Halton, Hamilton, Kanata, Kingston, Kitchener, Lindsay, Leamington, Listowel, London, Markham, Midland, Milton, Mississauga,  Newmarket, Niagara Falls, North Bay, North York, Oakville, Orangeville, Orillia, Oshawa, Ottawa, Owen Sound, Peel Region, Peterborough, Pickering, Richmond Hill, Sarnia, Scarborough, Sault Ste. Marie, St. Thomas, St. Catharines, Stratford, Sudbury, Thornhill, Thunder Bay, Timmins, Toronto, Trenton, Vaughan, Waterloo, Welland, Windsor, Woodbridge, Woodstock, York, York Region Ontario Canada

BJJ vs Judo

Tuesday, June 23rd, 2009

Before MMA, UFC, BJJ and other combat-related TLAs, there was Gracie vs. Kimura; or, in today’s terms,  ‘Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ) vs Judo.’

The date was 1955, Dana White still a gleam in his father’s eye.  The 38 year old Kimura was to fight a slightly older and lighter Hélio Gracie in what was known as a submission Judo match.

Taking place in Gracie’s native Brazil in front of 20,000 martial arts fans, the bout lasted just over 13 minutes, and saw Gracie repeatedly thrown, battered, smothered and man-handled by the most famous Judoka of the time – Kimura. 

A true warrior, Gracie refused to submit – even as Kimura was breaking his arm.  As a result, Gracie’s corner threw in the towel to prevent further injury.

Ironically,  the arm lock that resulted in Gracie’s broken arm would later be called the Kimura Arm Lock – also known in BJJ and MMA circles as the Kimura* –  paying homage to the Japanese Judoka.

*Known in Judo as ude garami (arm entanglement)

Judo Club Directory Serving Toronto, Acton, Ajax, Aurora, Barrie, Belleville, Bolton, Bowmanville, Bradford, Brampton, Brantford, Brockville, Burlington, Cambridge, Chatham, Cornwall, Elliot Lake, Etobicoke, Georgetown, Guelph, Halton, Hamilton, Kanata, Kingston, Kitchener, Lindsay, Leamington, Listowel, London, Markham, Midland, Milton, Mississauga,  Newmarket, Niagara Falls, North Bay, North York, Oakville, Orangeville, Orillia, Oshawa, Ottawa, Owen Sound, Peel Region, Peterborough, Pickering, Richmond Hill, Sarnia, Scarborough, Sault Ste. Marie, St. Thomas, St. Catharines, Stratford, Sudbury, Thornhill, Thunder Bay, Timmins, Toronto, Trenton, Vaughan, Waterloo, Welland, Windsor, Woodbridge, Woodstock, York, York Region Ontario Canada