Archive for the ‘Grappling’ Category

Budokai Judo Club: Toronto’s Newest Martial Arts Club for Kids of All Ages

Tuesday, July 24th, 2012

Based in North York, Ontario, Budokai Judo Club is the Greater Toronto’s Area’s (GTA) answer to the best in professional judo instruction for kids of all ages.

Known for its physical and psychological benefits (fitness, confidence, bully-proofing), judo is the ideal martial art for kids.  Both a martial art and an official Olympic sport since 1964.

Many say that judo is the best martial art for kids

Judo is at its most effective when one is being attached or assaulted. With its emphasis on leverage, judo teaches a smaller person how to overcome a larger person using minimal force by using an attacker’s strength against them.

As Budokai judo instructor Ray Litvak says, “A well trained judoka (judo practitioner) is not in the habit of starting a fight.  At Budokai, we teach students how to avoid physical confrontations. But when presented with no other alternative, a well-trained judoka will finish a fight.”

Founded by Sensei’s Rick Koglin and Ray Litvak, (Certified Judo black belts and instructors), the goal of the club is to imbue its students with the character, confidence and courage that practicing judo over time instills in its students.

Judo is practiced by children (boys and girls) men and women world-wide and the club welcomes all, from beginner to advanced judoka.

The club is located in the heart of North York at  1110-5 Finch Ave. West, North York, Ontario M3J 2T2 and is located in the North York Aikido Club/Aikido Hokuryukai.  The club will officially open its doors on Sunday August, 19, 2012.  For more information, or to pre-register,  please contact  Rick Koglin at (416) 712-6751 or  e-mail us today.

About Budokai Judo Club

Based in North York, Ontario, Budokai Judo Club is the Greater Toronto Area’s (GTA) answer to professional judo instruction (recreational, fitness and competitive) for people of all ages.

Providing judo lessons for the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) including Toronto, North York, Downsview, Vaughan, Thornhill, Richmond Hill, Woodbridge and York Region, Ontario.

Judo Club Toronto

FILA World Grappling Canadian Team Trials come to Orangeville August 7 and 8

Friday, July 30th, 2010

Fight fans based in Orangeville, Ontario will feel pretty lucky on August 7 and 8. Why? Because the FILA World Grappling Championship comes to town.

The Canadian team trials will take place all weekend at the Alder Rink in Oakville. The stakes are high; the winners in each weight class will represent Canada at the World Grappling Championships in Hungary later in 2010.

The tournament is open to any grapplers aged 20 and up, with Gi and no-Gi competition both available. The big question for aspiring competitors before they sign up is: what exactly constitutes grappling?

That’s what makes the World Grappling Team Trials so exciting. Grappling isn’t to be confused with wrestling. It can involve wrestling but there are many other martial arts that fall under the “grappling” umbrella. Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Judo, Sambo and many other styles will be on display. There’s no one way to defeat your opponent and we’re sure to see some exciting matches as a result.

 The grappling on hand will involve virtually every non-striking element of mixed martial arts. Fighters will be awarded points for takedowns and dominant control positions on the ground, such as the full mount, side mount or back mount. Submissions are in play as well.

As for weight classes, men can compete at 60, 65, 70, 75, 80, 90, or 110 kilograms plus the Absolute max category. Women will grapple at 50, 55, 60, 65, 75 and Absolute.

Ready to register for the Canadian team trials and test your grappling skills against the country’s best? Visit http://www.wrestling.ca/events/event.php?id=944 to register. Download the entry form and e-mail it to ckingsbury@wrestling.ca.

Be there on August 7 and 8 and take a huge step toward becoming one of the world’s top grapplers.

2009 Canadian Submission Expo

Saturday, September 5th, 2009

The ‘2009 Canadian Submission Expo’ will take place on Sunday September 20th at Martingrove Collegiate.

Showcasing Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ) and Grappling, the tournament will host top competitors from Ontario, Quebec and Internationally including a Pan Am Champion, Mundial Champion, Mundial Double medalist, 2 Fila grappling National Champions and Abu Dhabi Pro National Champion.

Divisions will include both ‘Gi’ and ‘No Gi.’

More Details

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ) – Toronto, Acton, Ajax, Aurora, Barrie, Belleville, Bolton, Bowmanville, Bradford, Brampton, Brantford, Brockville, Burlington, Cambridge, Chatham, Cornwall, Elliot Lake, Etobicoke, Georgetown, Guelph, Halton, Hamilton, Kanata, Kingston, Kitchener, Lindsay, Leamington, Listowel, London, Markham, Midland, Milton, Mississauga,  Newmarket, Niagara Falls, North Bay, North York, Oakville, Orangeville, Orillia, Oshawa, Ottawa, Owen Sound, Peel Region, Peterborough, Pickering, Richmond Hill, Sarnia, Scarborough, Sault Ste. Marie, St. Thomas, St. Catharines, Stratford, Sudbury, Thornhill, Thunder Bay, Timmins, Toronto, Trenton, Vaughan, Waterloo, Welland, Windsor, Woodbridge, Woodstock, York, York Region Ontario Canada

Royce Gracie Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ) Seminar

Tuesday, September 1st, 2009

Royce Gracie – the original Ultimate Fighter and winner of UFC 1 – will be holding a Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ) seminar (Gi Required) in Hamilton, Ontario.

The seminar will take place on Monday September 14th from 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. and will be held at Joslin’s Mixed Martial Arts.

The cost is $120.00 with limited availability.

For more information, e-mail info@jeffjoslinmma.com

2009 Joslin’s Canadian Open Grappling Championships

Monday, August 31st, 2009

Joslin’s 2009 Canadian Open Grappling Championships will be taking place on Saturday November 7th and Sunday November 8th in Hamilton, Ontario Canada.

Saturday will feature ‘Gi Grappling’ with Sunday featuring ‘No Gi Grappling’ competition.

In all, there will be 142 divisions spread across:
• Junior Gi and No-Gi divisions
• Master Divisions for competitors ages 30+
• Team Awards

The event is taking place at Sherwood High School which is located at 25 High Street in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

To register online or for more information please visit Joslin’s Mixed Martial Arts & Cardio Kickbox Center.

BJJ & Submission Grappling News

Friday, August 28th, 2009

Submission grapplers and fans of submission grappling will want to mark MMA Expo 2009 in Montreal on their grappling calendar.

Held on the weekend of October 17th and 18th, MMA Expo Montreal will host two of the world’s most prestigious submission grappling tournaments and feature some of the best submission grapplers and BJJ competitors in the world.  One of the prizes will include an all expenses paid trip to attend the 2010 World Cup in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.

The joint venture agreement, signed by Gerald Chopik – President of the Mixed Martial Arts Expo – will mark “the first time ever that the Abu Dhabi Combat Club (ADCC) No-Gi Submission Series and the Abu Dhabi Pro BJJ Series will be held on the same weekend and the same venue.”

Submission Grappling  Toronto, Acton, Ajax, Aurora, Barrie, Belleville, Bolton, Bowmanville, Bradford, Brampton, Brantford, Brockville, Burlington, Cambridge, Chatham, Cornwall, Elliot Lake, Etobicoke, Georgetown, Guelph, Halton, Hamilton, Kanata, Kingston, Kitchener, Lindsay, Leamington, Listowel, London, Markham, Midland, Milton, Mississauga, Montreal, Newmarket, Niagara Falls, North Bay, North York, Oakville, Orangeville, Orillia, Oshawa, Ottawa, Owen Sound, Peel Region, Peterborough, Pickering, Richmond Hill, Sarnia, Scarborough, Sault Ste. Marie, St. Thomas, St. Catharines, Stratford, Sudbury, Thornhill, Thunder Bay, Timmins, Toronto, Trenton, Vaughan, Waterloo, Welland, Windsor, Woodbridge, Woodstock, York, York Region Ontario Canada.

Grappling News Update

Monday, July 27th, 2009

Mixed Martial Arts Expo Founder and President – Gerald Chopik – recently inked a deal that will bring one of the most prestigious Grappling tournaments in the world to MMA Expo Toronto and other Canadian cities throughout 2010.

The tournaments are a joint venture between MMA Expo and Abu Dhabi Combat Club. 

Fight Planet, a Hamilton-based MMA retailer will be the official sponsor of the new ADCC Canadian Qualifier Series.

Find out more about Grappling

Top 10 Differences Between BJJ and Judo

Friday, July 24th, 2009

After 30 years of doing anything – or anyone – continuously, one might find themselves at a crossroads, perhaps feeling that change is in order.  Some call this a mid-life crisis and as a result may get married, divorced, re-married, divorced again, commit a crime spree or just buy a white sports car.  At 45 years of age, I’d done most of the above.

But my case was different.  The crisis I was experiencing was a ‘Martial Arts Mid Life Crisis.’  Yes, 30 years of doing any martial art – Judo in this case – can do that to you. 

So I strayed and left my first martial art love for something new – Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ). 

Why BJJ?  I suppose the seed had been planted back in 1993 after witnessing my first UFC.  Watching Royce Gracie choke and armlock his way to victory using techniques familiar to and practiced by Judoka everywhere, but with funky names like the Kimura, Guard and Triangle Choke. 

Other reasons for choosing BJJ were to test my Judo skills against this fairly new art – 95% of which takes place on the ground – and to better learn how to fight off my back.

So, I joined a BJJ Club.  What follows are some first hand observations and noted differences between these 2 related, yet different, martial arts:

1. Lineage: Judo was developed in Japan by Jigoro Kano in the late 1800’s, a variation of Jujitsu.    As its namesake implies, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ) was developed and modified in Brazil by the Gracie brothers after having being taught Judo.
2. Uniform: Judoka wear heavy weave Gi’s (kimonos) tied by a belt and with no undergarments (save underwear – hopefully); BJJ practitioners tend to wear a single weave and much lighter Gi that is tied by a belt.  They also tend to wear funky form fitting and shiny undergarments called rash guards that can be worn under the Gi.  For lack of a better term, they’re cool. Furthermore, BJJ practitioners adorn and accessorize their Gi’s with color-coordinated patches and logos, usually representing clubs, affiliations and/or both.  Lastly, BJJ can be practised with a Gi or no Gi; a big plus for those interested in MMA and Self-Defense.
3. Fighting Styles: Traditional Judo clubs focus on throws and takedowns which are scored accordingly in shiai (tournaments).  For example, a perfect throw, one that demonstrates control, power and impetus can score a perfect point, the equivalent of a knockout punch.  A perfect throw (Ippon) is the ultimate goal of most Judoka.  One can also win on the ground via a submission (choke, arm lock) and/or hold down.  Most Judo Clubs will focus 70-80 percent (or more) of their training on throws with the balance on ground work.  Conversely, BJJ practitioners spend about 80-90 percent (or more) on the ground.  Throws and takedowns are secondary and are scored as such.  The ultimate goal in BJJ competition is a submission.
4. Tempo: For advanced BJJ competitors – blue to black belt – matches can run from 6 to 10 minutes with the majority of the contest taking placing on the ground/grappling.  The average Judo match – for advanced and beginners – runs 5 minutes, with the majority of the contest taking place standing up.  Unlike BJJ, if a Judo contest does go to the ground, fighters are given very little time to work a hold down or submission and if there is no immediate progression, fighters are quickly brought back to the standing position.  As well, a lull in action from either fighter results in penalties. As a result of shorter matches and penalties for inactivity, Judo fights tend to be faster paced and more frenetic. BJJ fights tend to have a slower tempo as fighters work on the ground to gain position, control and eventually, submissions.  Extended durations may also result in a slower and more deliberate pace during BJJ matches, in large part to conserve energy and to set an opponent up for a submission.
5. Terminology: Steeped in Japanese tradition, Judo throws and techniques have Japanese origins and names.  For example, the fireman’s carry (a common wrestling takedown) is known as ‘kata-guruma’ in Judo.  Another common wrestling takedown – the double leg takedown – is known as ‘morote-gari’ in Judo. The rear naked choke is known as ‘hadaka jime.’  BJJ, on the other hand, has exotic and descriptive names that roll off the tongue and pique the imagination.  For example, ‘peruvian neck tie,’ ‘omoplata,’ ‘nonoplata,’ ‘gogoplata’ and more. Other techniques have been anglicized and named so that the average person can easily visualize them, even those with no martial arts background.  For example, the ‘guillotine choke,’ ‘clock choke,’ ‘collar choke,’ ‘spin around armbar,’ ‘guard to arm lock no gi.’ These terms, for lack of a better term, just sound cool. 
6. Belt Gradings: Judoka begin at white belt and from there, progress to yellow, orange, green, blue, brown and eventually black belt.  At each level, students are required to know a certain number of throws, hold downs, chokes, and arm locks to advance.  For black belt, it is necessary to perform ‘kata’ which are also known as forms.  Prior to being eligible for a black belt and performing ‘kata,’ a Judoka must first  compete and accumulate a certain amount of  points by entering tournaments and winning fights.  Depending on how they win and the rank of the person(s) they beat, they are awarded points.  The process is very formal. An enthusiastic Judoka that practices 3-4 times per week and that competes should be able to attain their first degree black belt within 4-5 years.  Like Judo, BJJ uses a belt grading system, but that is where the similarity ends.  BJJ practitioners start as white belts and progress to blue, purple, brown and black belt.  After attaining each belt, stripes may also be awarded to signify progress and levels of competence.  Rather than forms, belt gradings are informal and conservative in nature: belts are awarded at the instructor’s discretion and seem to be heavily influenced by attendance, progress and time spent on the mat.  That said, a BJJ practitioner may remain at the same belt level for years at a time.  An enthusiastic and avid BJJ practitioner should be able to attain their black belt within 8-9 years.  An exceptional student, perhaps sooner.
7. Honorifics: Seniority and respect play a large role in Judo.  Senior students and/or instructors are referred to as ‘Sempai’ and are the equivalent of mentors while ‘Kohai’ are the equivalent of  trainees.  In Judo, the term ‘Sensei’ is usually reserved for 3rd degree black belts and up, but may be used by colored belts when addressing any black belt.  The term is used in reference to those that have achieved a certain level of mastery and maturity.  In BJJ, the equivalent of Sensei is Professor and is only used when addressing black belts.   The term ‘professor’ has a scholarly overtone and again, is one that the average person can easily identify with. 
8. Profit vs Non-Profit: As a rule, Judo Clubs are run as non-profit and can often be found in community center’s and/or rented out spaces.  It’s rare to find a Judo Club as a standalone storefront/entity.  Unlike Judo, BJJ is for profit and charges accordingly; charging what Judo clubs ought to be charging.
9. Conduct: Judo tends to be formal in its on-the-mat interactions.  For example, it is proper etiquette to bow before entering and after leaving the dojo mat area.  It is also proper etiquette to bow to your partner before and after a randori (freestyle practice or sparring) and/or ne-waza (ground work/grappling) practice session.  BJJ clubs are less formal and as a rule, emphasize camaraderie more so than formality.  For example, prior to and following a practice session (rolling), participants will shake or slap hands.  Should one partner submit the other during a rolling session, they will break and shake or slap hands.  At the end of the BJJ class, everyone is acknowledged and appreciated for their efforts with hand shakes, hand slaps and partial hugs.
Note: this is the behavior demonstrated at the BJJ club that yours truly belongs to and, as a result, can not be verified as common practice among all BJJ clubs.
10. Perception: Although an Olympic sport, practiced world-wide and over 100 years old, Judo has an image problem.  In general, the Judo community has no idea how to market itself.  Rather than embracing a resurgence in Martial Arts vis-a-vis MMA and the UFC, Judo seems to have turned a blind eye to the opportunity, preferring to suffer in silence.   Sadly, if Judo were an animal, it would be on the endangered species list.  On the other hand, BJJ is flourishing. It is marketed as a form of self-defense and a staple to any serious mixed-martial artists game.  No doubt helped in large part by the UFC, Royce Gracie’s MMA legacy and the continued success of BJJ practitioners in mixed martial arts.

In essence, both Judo and BJJ are great sports/martial arts and forms of self-defense that have a lot to offer both purists and mixed martial artists alike.  Now, if Judo can learn from the BJJ brain trust, it just may have a fighting chance of surviving the coming decades.  In the meantime, I’ve temporarily traded in my Judo black belt for a BJJ white belt and am enjoying every minute of it.

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ) – Toronto, Acton, Ajax, Aurora, Barrie, Belleville, Bolton, Bowmanville, Bradford, Brampton, Brantford, Brockville, Burlington, Cambridge, Chatham, Cornwall, Elliot Lake, Etobicoke, Georgetown, Guelph, Halton, Hamilton, Kanata, Kingston, Kitchener, Lindsay, Leamington, Listowel, London, Markham, Midland, Milton, Mississauga,  Newmarket, Niagara Falls, North Bay, North York, Oakville, Orangeville, Orillia, Oshawa, Ottawa, Owen Sound, Peel Region, Peterborough, Pickering, Richmond Hill, Sarnia, Scarborough, Sault Ste. Marie, St. Thomas, St. Catharines, Stratford, Sudbury, Thornhill, Thunder Bay, Timmins, Toronto, Trenton, Vaughan, Waterloo, Welland, Windsor, Woodbridge, Woodstock, York, York Region Ontario Canada

Bushido Grappling Championship ~ Ottawa, Ontario

Monday, July 6th, 2009

August 23rd, 2009 is the date of The ‘Team Bushido MMA & Fitness Complex’ Grappling Championship.

The event will be held at 2234 Gladwin Crescent in Ottawa, Ontario and feature 19 divisions.  Competitors will be guaranteed a minimum of 2 bouts.

Gi Grapplers are S.O.L. as this party is Gi-Free; in other words, don’t bring the Gi.

Still plenty of time to make weight with 6 weeks to go.

For more details call 613-260-8262 or contact Jiu Jitsu Canada at Admin@JiuJitsuCanada.Org

Grappling  Toronto, Acton, Ajax, Aurora, Barrie, Belleville, Bolton, Bowmanville, Bradford, Brampton, Brantford, Brockville, Burlington, Cambridge, Chatham, Cornwall, Elliot Lake, Etobicoke, Georgetown, Guelph, Halton, Hamilton, Kanata, Kingston, Kitchener, Lindsay, Leamington, Listowel, London, Markham, Midland, Milton, Mississauga,  Newmarket, Niagara Falls, North Bay, North York, Oakville, Orangeville, Orillia, Oshawa, Ottawa, Owen Sound, Peel Region, Peterborough, Pickering, Richmond Hill, Sarnia, Scarborough, Sault Ste. Marie, St. Thomas, St. Catharines, Stratford, Sudbury, Thornhill, Thunder Bay, Timmins, Toronto, Trenton, Vaughan, Waterloo, Welland, Windsor, Woodbridge, Woodstock, York, York Region Ontario Canada.

2009 Team Ontario Grappling Qualifiers Tournament

Sunday, July 5th, 2009

Taking place on Saturday July 18th is the ‘2009 Team Ontario National Grappling Qualifiers’ tournament.

Held at The University of Toronto’s Mississauga Campus, the event will feature both men’s and women’s Gi and No Gi divisions.

The event is hosted by The Toronto Grappling Club.  The entry fee will be $50.00 for those that pre-register before July 15th, 2009.

Eligible gold medalists will be sponsored to attend the World Team Trials on August 8th in Ottawa, Ontario.

For more information, e-mail info@torontojiujitsu.com or call 416-939-5973.

Grappling Martial Arts  Toronto, Acton, Ajax, Aurora, Barrie, Belleville, Bolton, Bowmanville, Bradford, Brampton, Brantford, Brockville, Burlington, Cambridge, Chatham, Cornwall, Elliot Lake, Etobicoke, Georgetown, Guelph, Halton, Hamilton, Kanata, Kingston, Kitchener, Lindsay, Leamington, Listowel, London, Markham, Midland, Milton, Mississauga,  Newmarket, Niagara Falls, North Bay, North York, Oakville, Orangeville, Orillia, Oshawa, Ottawa, Owen Sound, Peel Region, Peterborough, Pickering, Richmond Hill, Sarnia, Scarborough, Sault Ste. Marie, St. Thomas, St. Catharines, Stratford, Sudbury, Thornhill, Thunder Bay, Timmins, Toronto, Trenton, Vaughan, Waterloo, Welland, Windsor, Woodbridge, Woodstock, York, York Region Ontario Canada.