Archive for the ‘Boxing’ Category

The top three boxers in MMA today

Tuesday, November 22nd, 2011

By Matt Larkin

Guest Writer

A few weeks ago, I made my picks for the top three wrestlers in MMA today. Now, let’s turn our attention to the masters of the Sweet Science. Which three mixed martial artists would have the best chance of contending as pro boxers? Here are my picks, keeping in mind that I’m not referring to strikers overall – just pure boxers.

Another aside: Anderson Silva will appear on the Muay Thai list instead. And George St-Pierre, as good as he is, just misses the cut as he hasn’t shown knockout power with his boxing yet.

1. Vitor Belfort

To me, the Phenom is the guy most MMA insiders mention as “someone who could immediately contend if he switched to pro boxing.” Belfort’s hands are both lightning-fast and powerful and he strings together vicious combinations. In a pure fist fight, there’s no one better.

2. Junior Dos Santos

Dos Santos has emerged as a close second to Belfort. The UFC heavyweight champ is similar in that he relies almost exclusively on his boxing to beat opponents. Trained by Brazil’s Olympic coach, JDS has great speed for a heavyweight and devastating uppercut.

3. Mark Hominick

That Mark Hominick even survived five rounds to Jose Aldo is a testament to his outstanding boxing ability. Place the Canadian featherweight in the cage with any other opponent and he outclasses him in the striking game. Hominick has crisp technique, outstanding accuracy and knocks guys out more often than people think.

What? No Nick Diaz? He picks opponents apart with his precise, long reach but loses points for his nonchalant defensive approach and pitter-patter power.

St-Pierre vs Tyson: Why GSP would win

Wednesday, August 11th, 2010

A writer named Brian D’Souza wrote an interesting column on the Grant Brothers MMA website this week. It weighed in on a fascinating question: who would win an MMA fight between prime Georges St-Pierre and prime Mike Tyson?

The well-written, carefully thought out article can be read here:

http://grantbrothersmma.com/boxing/brian-dsouza-special-to-tss-st-pierre-vs-tyson-whod-win/

In a nutshell, D’Souza argues that Tyson would beat St-Pierre on the strength of his superior size, speed, punching power and discipline to train hard in submission and takedown defense. It just so happens that I feel the opposite way. I’ll explain myself by counter-arguing D’Souza’s key points.

ARGUMENT #1: Tyson’s size would be too much for St-Pierre.

The initial reaction is to assume Mike Tyson is too big for Georges St-Pierre but that argument neglects two important factors: reach and weight cutting. First off, St-Pierre and Tyson are the same height, each listed at roughly 5’11”. Tyson’s reach is 72 inches; St-Pierre’s is 76. So GSP would have a chance to keep Tyson at bay with his jab.

More importantly, while Tyson fights well north of 200 pounds, he actually wouldn’t be much bigger than the biggest man GSP has faced. Thiago Alves is a beast; St-Pierre told Michael Landsberg on Off the Record that Alves walks around at up to 210 pounds yet cuts all the way down to 170.

That means St-Pierre battled a man almost Tyson’s size at UFC 100 – and one with far better takedown defense than Tyson would have.

ARGUMENT #2: Tyson’s speed would overwhelm St-Pierre

There’s no denying that Tyson’s furious speed added to his terrifying presence at the peak of his boxing career. But we should remember that St-Pierre is known for being one of the top two or three athletes in mixed martial arts. He’s fast as can be – and also a great punch evader. He scores so many takedowns largely because he dodges strikes at the perfect moment right before he shoots.

ARGUMENT #3: St-Pierre couldn’t handle Tyson’s punching power

In MMA, punching power amounts to the law of diminishing returns in my opinion. Sure, Tyson would probably hit harder than anyone in the history of MMA. But as long as you hit hard enough to have devastating one-punch knockout power, registering a 12 out of 10 on the scale won’t help you much more than a 10 out of 10 would.

I think we all agreed that both Thiago Alves and Dan Hardy had major puncher’s chances against St-Pierre. That is, if they caught him with a clean shot, they both absolutely had the ability to put him to sleep instantaneously. Tyson could do the same, yes, but what threat would he bring that Alves and Hardy haven’t already brought? All three guys are simply powerful punchers who can drop an opponent with one swing. Sure, Tyson hits even harder, but they all pose the same threat to a guy like GSP. A knockout is a knockout.

Factoring in those arguments, a prime Mike Tyson would be a faster Thiago Alves with serious KO power. GSP’s strategy wouldn’t change. He’d need to use his reach to keep Tyson at bay and look to shoot for the takedown – only he wouldn’t have to worry about Muay Thai knees or a good sprawl. It doesn’t matter how hard Tyson trained. St-Pierre has taken down MMA’s best wrestlers. Getting Tyson down wouldn’t be a problem.

So there you have it – my take on GSP/Tyson. I think St-Pierre would win because Tyson isn’t nearly as unique a challenge as some people would have you believe. And his lack of versatility would make him even more predictable than GSP’s typical opponents.

Boxing Gym North York, Toronto, Brampton, Etobicoke, Markham, Mississauga, Oshawa, Peel Region, Pickering, Richmond Hill, Scarborough, Thornhill, Vaughan, Woodbridge, York, York Region Ontario Canada.

Which Martial Art is Best? Part 6: BOXING

Sunday, April 18th, 2010

Unlike the other martial arts I’ve covered during this hypothetical debate about which style is best, boxing needs no introduction. It’s the most common, heavily publicized and, according to some, the most basic form of bodily combat. But just because boxing is so popular doesn’t mean we can’t learn something about it. Let’s try!

How about a little history? Essentially, as long as fighting has existed, boxing has existed. Dating back to ancient Roman battles, it was a last resort for disarmed warriors. It was done for sport in Greece and eventually became an “entertainment” event when English prizefighting developed in the 1700s.

Believe it or not, the current rules we see today in boxing, from low-blows to rabbit punches to standing eight-counts, are as old as Canada. The “Marquess of Queensberry” rules originated way back in 1867.

Famous boxers: Muhammad Ali, Mike Tyson, Floyd Mayweather Jr.

We don’t need to detail the careers of these famous athletes, do we? Instead, let’s cut to the chase. It’s actually a question many MMA fans have asked over the last few years: Can a skilled boxer succeed against other martial artists?

The answer may be “yes and no.” Through the jab, boxers do a great job keeping opponents at bay; while any boxer who gets taken down may lose quickly, the opponent still has to reach the boxer to shoot – and that’s no easy task. Also, through repetition and development of powerful striking via turning the hips in training, boxers arguably hit harder than any other martial artists if you judge the strikes’ effectiveness on pure knockout power.

As a discipline, however, I don’t rank boxing particularly high. Ironically, the Marquess of Queensberry set boxers back in terms of their real-world effectiveness. Boxers are engineered to thrive in “ideal” conditions – against other boxers, with no kicking or takedowns. Most other martial artists are equipped to survive in any situation. Since boxing doesn’t prepare a fighter for ground battles, I don’t rank it high. Even a master takedown evader can’t stuff every attempt.

By Matt Larkin
Guest Writer

Boxing Gym North York,  North York, Brampton, Etobicoke, Markham, Mississauga, Oshawa, Peel Region, Pickering, Richmond Hill, Scarborough, Thornhill, Vaughan, Woodbridge, York, York Region Ontario Canada.

Hats off to Boxing’s Manny Pacquiao

Tuesday, April 6th, 2010

I have only good things to say about boxing superstar Manny Pacquiao right now – and not simply because he made it look so easy against Joshua Clottey a few weeks back.

Sure, he ran circles around Clottey, virtually pitching a shutout, but that was expected. After all, Clottey had already lost to Miguel Cotto, a man Pacquiao pummelled. He was an obvious mismatch.

What impressed me most about Pacquiao was his comment after the fight when asked about MMA. Instead of taking the well-traveled boxer route and bashing the sport, claiming he could crush any mixed martial artist, a-la James Toney and Floyd Mayweather Jr., Pacquiao honoured the sport.

He claimed that MMA, while too violent for him, is “a sport that should be recognized” and “a great sport.” He may be off about the “too violent” part; I argue that MMA is safer than boxing, as the referees do more to protect the fighters and combatants take far fewer head shots. But I’m thrilled to see Pacquiao give MMA some love.

It’s too bad that we won’t ever see Pacquiao in the cage. Considering that he’s won boxing titles in a zillion different weight classes, it’s only natural to wonder what kind of damage he could do if he learned some grappling and forayed into MMA.

For now, we’ll have to hold out hope for the other legends. Toney is taking the plunge, Roy Jones Jr. has hinted repeatedly that he wants to battle Anderson Silva (in boxing) and, of course, there’s Mayweather. I’ll settle for him and Pacquiao finally putting aside their differences and meeting in the ring, but it sure would be a treat to put Floyd in the Octagon. He’d be dangerous as can be on the feet and impossible to hit – not to mention a good heel for the crowd.

It’s all food for thought. But I think Manny Pacquiao is taking a step in the right direction by implying that boxing and MMA can co-exist.

By Matt Larkin
Guest Writer

Boxing Gym Toronto,  North York, Brampton, Etobicoke, Markham, Mississauga, Oshawa, Peel Region, Pickering, Richmond Hill, Scarborough, Thornhill, Vaughan, Woodbridge, York, York Region Ontario Canada.

Women’s Boxing in 2012 Olympics

Saturday, August 15th, 2009

London will be host to the 2012 Olympics and if amateur boxing has its way, will also usher in a new era in women’s amateur boxing.

Women have enjoyed representation in Olympic combat sports for years including Judo, Wrestling and Tae Kwon Do, making the absence of female boxing a bit of a mystery.

According to International Boxing Association president Wu Ching-Kuo, “Boxing is the only sport in the Olympic programme without women and we believe we are ready.”

The decision to allow women’s boxing in the Olympics should be made sometime in 2009.

Boxing & Boxing Clubs – Toronto, Acton, Ajax, Aurora, Barrie, Belleville, Bolton, Bowmanville, Bradford, Brampton, Brantford, Brockville, Burlington, Cambridge, Chatham, Cornwall, Elliot Lake, Etobicoke, Georgetown, Guelph, Halton, Hamilton, Kanata, Kingston, Kitchener, Lindsay, Leamington, Listowel, London, Markham, Midland, Milton, Mississauga,  Newmarket, Niagara Falls, North Bay, North York, Oakville, Orangeville, Orillia, Oshawa, Ottawa, Owen Sound, Peel Region, Peterborough, Pickering, Richmond Hill, Sarnia, Scarborough, Sault Ste. Marie, St. Thomas, St. Catharines, Stratford, Sudbury, Thornhill, Thunder Bay, Timmins, Toronto, Trenton, Vaughan, Waterloo, Welland, Windsor, Woodbridge, Woodstock, York, York Region Ontario Canada.

Ontario Boxing ~ Club Shows

Monday, June 15th, 2009

The following amateur boxing clubs will be hosting ‘boxing shows’ during the month of June:

Venue: Centre Ring Boxing Club
Sponsored By: Centre Ring Boxing Club
Date: June 25, 2009
Location: 1992 Yonge St, Toronto, Ontario
Time: 7:30 p.m.
Contact: Wayne Bourque 416.485.5686

Venue: Annadale Golf Club
Sponsored By: Ajax Boxing Club
Date: June 21, 2009
Location: 221 Church St. South, Ajax, Ontario
Time: 2:00 p.m.
Contact: Marcus Price 905.926.8555

Venue: Rec Plex
Sponsored By: Tri Star Boxing Club
Date: June 27, 2009
Location: 1724 Mosley St, Wasaga Beach, Ontario
Time: 7:00 p.m.
Contact: Floyd Porter 519.358.1757

Venue: Uncle Vetos Rhythm Kitchen
Sponsored By: Tri Star Boxing Club
Host: East Windsor Boxing Club
Date: June 27, 2009
Location: 61 Richmond St. Amherstburg, Ontario
Time: 1:00 p.m.
Contact: Chuck Stewart Jr. 519.739.5757

Venue: Fight Club Canada
Sponsored By: Fight Club Canada
Date: June 28, 2009
Location: 4536 Portage Rd, Niagara Falls, Ontario
Time: 1:00 p.m.
Contact: Matt Skinner 905.357.9349

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